Kriss Stevens & Scott Manley - CENTURY 21 Cobb Real Estate



Posted by Kriss Stevens & Scott Manley on 4/1/2018

Moving into a new home can often be a frantic, exhausting task. Matters are made worse if the house you are moving into wasn’t cleaned thoroughly after the previous movers left.

 However, the best time to clean a house is before you move in. This is due to the fact that cleaning shelves is easier before they’ve been filled, and vacuuming carpets is simpler if the house doesn’t yet have any furniture.

 So, in this article we’re going to show you the best way to clean your new home before you move in to avoid having to move objects around once you’ve brought them inside.

 Before moving day

 The idea moment to clean your new home is before the moving truck arrives. If possible, pick a day after the previous owners have moved out that is close to your move-in date. Bring all of your cleaning supplies with you, including cloths, towels, a duster, vacuum, hardwood floor polish, glass cleaner, bathroom cleaner, and so on.

It might be tempting to just start scrubbing as soon as you’re inside, but first take a moment to walk through the house and make a list of all the cleaning tasks you would like to accomplish before moving in.

Not only will your list help you determine how long you’ll need to clean, but it will also give some organization to your day and keep you on track.

On or after moving day

You don’t always have the luxury of being able to clean your new home beforehand. If you’re moving across states or are on a tight move-in/move-out schedule, you might have to clean your house as you move in.

In this case, the best solution is to organize your boxes and furniture by room. Then, when moving them inside, put them in the corner of a room in a neat pile. This will leave access to most of the room so that you can clean before putting things away.

Make sure you and your family are on the same page in terms of organizing items on moving day. If you have family members who start unpacking boxes, let them know they could be more helpful by picking up a duster or cleaning some windows rather than putting items in their future places.

Room by room cleaning

There are some rooms in your house that require special attention. Let’s start with the kitchen.

When it comes to cleaning your appliances (refrigerator, oven, microwave, etc.), it’s a good idea to spray on some degreaser or baking soda/vinegar solutions in advance to let them soak and loosen up any debris before you start scrubbing them. Soaking them all at once will help you save time cleaning.

The bathroom poses a challenge when moving in for two reasons. Since bathrooms tend to be small and crowded, it can be hard to work inside of them if there are boxes in the way. To avoid this, stack all of your bathroom items outside in the hallway or in the bathroom closet while you clean.




Categories: Moving Tips   Cleaning   move-in  


Posted by Kriss Stevens & Scott Manley on 11/13/2016

Moving can be a daunting task. There are so many things to keep track of and a lot of feelings come up along the way as you pack up your home and live in chaos for the next few weeks leading up to, and even after, the move. Never fear! There are things you can do to make the moving process go all the more smooth, so whether it's your first time or your fifth you'll look like a downright pro! Prepare ahead of time - create a master list of everything that needs to be done before, during, and after the move. Take note of important deadlines and create a master timeline like move out and move in dates, utility cancellations in the old house, utility set up in the new house and when to hand in the keys. Put together an overnight bag with all your personal necessities you'll need on hand during the move and a box full of the everyday house goods you will need on hand your first day in the new house. Decide on which order you are going to pack up your rooms and add these days to your deadline list. You will also want to make a list of any repairs and cleaning that needs to be done before moving day. Strategize - Know where everything is going ahead of time. This means a room by room plan prepared before moving day. Label boxes with not only what is inside but what room it will need to go into. You can even take this a step further by color coding boxes by room. If you need to take furniture apart, pack the screws and small bits in a sandwich bag and label what furniture they belong to. If hiring movers, review any requirements they might have for move in day as some will only move boxes and not trash bags. Clean out - get rid of as much as possible at least a month before moving. The less there is to move, the easier it will be to pack up with less to carry. Anything shoved to the back of cupboards or closets and long forgotten can go. Do a closet purge and donate unwanted clothes. Hold a yard sale or put valuable items up for sale ahead of time to give yourself plenty of the time to get rid of things before you start packing. Don't add to the stock in your fridge during the last two weeks and consume what you can as moving day approaches. Allow your fridge to defrost the day before the move. During the move - stretch wrap any furniture with drawers to hold them in place. Pack a cooler with lunch and/or snack items ahead of time and keep it easily accessible during the move to refuel throughout the day. Clean and prepare the bathroom first stock it with soap, toilet paper, and towels. It will be good to go to take a shower at the end of the moving day! The list of things that need to get done when moving can be overwhelming, but with a master list in hand and some tricks up your sleeve, you can make the process feel a lot less stressful. In fact, you might even enjoy it!




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Kriss Stevens & Scott Manley on 12/20/2015

Choosing a place to store your personal belongings is an important decision.  You will want to make sure your prized possessions are safe and secure. Here are some hints on how to choose a storage facility: First, determine what kind of storage you need. Call a few facilities to ask about size, cost, climate-control, and access. Do some research online. You can try the Better Business Bureau and other online review sites. Contact the local police department to ask about the crime rate in the area where the facility is located. You may be able to find out if they've had any break-ins or reports of problems. Try to visit the facility in-person before you commit. This way you can tour the units and get answers to any questions you may have.    





Posted by Kriss Stevens & Scott Manley on 8/17/2014

Moving can be an expensive endeavor. Even if you decide to rent a truck and move your belongings yourself there are lots of other expenses that can add up. Luckily, there are a few simple ways consumers can save money hauling their belongings from their current home to the next one. Purge your things. Instead of moving things that you don't use sell or donate them. If you decide to donate items to charity, you could save lots of time and even get a tax deduction. Move on a less popular day. The most popular time to move is at the end of the month. Since most closings happen and leases are up at the end of the month there’s more competition for the trucks and moving crews. Moving at the end of the month will also cost you more. Choose your moving date midweek, closer to the middle of the month. Packing materials like bubble wrap and foam peanuts are costly. If you are packing your own items use things you have around the house like bed linens, towels and clothing to pad your items. You can also use newspapers and tissue paper from gift bags. Be careful when using newspaper as the newsprint will smudge on dishes and other items. Don't buy moving boxes check Freecycle and Craigslist for free ones first. Ask around, your friends may have boxes suitable for moving.





Posted by Kriss Stevens & Scott Manley on 12/2/2012

If you happen to find yourself moving to another state in the near future, you've got your work cut out for you.  On top of having to deal with the stress of relocating your family in an unfamiliar place, you'll have a lot of paperwork and research to consider before the big day.  Here are four things that you'll need to have covered if you hope to have a seamless transition into a new residence.  Keep in mind that the more bases you've got covered, the easier it will be for you and your family to get accustomed to a new state. 1.  Cost of living. - The cost of living can vary dramatically from state to state.  If you're moving for a new job, then make sure to research the cost of living close to your new place of employment.  If you lived in a metropolitan area before, then it may serve you better to move to a town surrounding the city and pull a commute than to take a gamble at throwing yourself into a new city that may upset your current lifestyle.  Alternately, you may find that the state you are moving to has a fairly low cost of living in the metropolitan areas compared to what you are used to paying.  Every state is different in this regard.  Doing the research now will save you major headaches. 2.  Moving companies. - Unless you are packing up all of your belongings yourself, odds are that you will be relying on a long-distance moving company to handle most of the work.  Prices of this service can very dramatically from company to company, so be sure to get at least three quotes from reputable moving companies as to ensure you're getting the best deal.  Also, make room in your budget for an insurance plan that you are comfortable paying for.  The last thing you'll want to deal with during your move is the worry of your possessions being damaged with no recourse. 3.  Taxes. -  You may not think that taxes are an important thing to consider this early in the game, but if you live in a state that doesn't collect an income tax, moving to a state that does can impact your cost of living.  Meet with a tax specialist and review any hidden taxes and expenses you may incur as a result of your move so you aren't surprised later on down the road. 4.  Neighborhoods and local culture. - This may be one of the most important steps that a lot of people overlook.  Just because you do a virtual walk through of a home and like what you see, doesn't mean you'll like where you're moving.  Do some detective work before you sign papers.  Look into crime statistics, school ratings, reviews of the city and neighborhood you're considering moving to, and local taxes and ordinances.  You can find all of this information online relatively easy.  If you can manage it, then plan a visit to your potential new home to see everything your new town will have to offer.  Look at the commute to your new place of employment, the sights and sounds of the local culture, and keep an eye out for anything you don't particularly like about a place.  You can make your transition a lot smoother by connecting with a reputable real estate agent who has a healthy knowledge of the area.